Game Theory Based Problem Solving

Game development theoretic R&D:

One perspective on much of human-borne problems in the world is referred to as The Tragedy of the Commons. This is a term used to describe a situation in which whereby ecosystem resources services can be used or extracted by individuals acting from their own self interest, drawn to varying amounts by different individuals and companies, while the costs of environmental destruction is shared more or less equally by all. Under that scenario, it appears is said to be in the best interest of individuals to take as much as possible. This leads to outcomes such as overgrazing, depletion of fish in the ocean, and/or global warming. There are many studies done both in natural observation, experimentation, and even computer simulation to try to solve the problem of how free agents can work as to create an optimum for the group in its entirety.  Rustling Roots is working on developing activities and games, based in game theory that can help shed light on broader political, economic, and ecological dynamics.

Hawk-Dove and Public Goods Games:

We are developing different ways of playing the hawk-dove game (https://web.stanford.edu/~jhj1/teachingdocs/Jones-ess-notes.pdf page 4) and the public goods game (http://systems-sciences.uni-graz.at/etextbook/gametheory/publicgoodgame.html) to study the ways in which people understand and attempt to solve this age-old problem.

Insurrection game:

We are developing a game to evaluate mechanisms of stability and instability in oppressive governments and the efficacy of revolutionary attempts. This is done through a large group game in a field settings. The game is an elaborate tag game of tactical collective action. It demonstrates how an entire society can be in an an undesirable situation yet how it is very difficult to make that change. The game brings up questions such as,  is designed to help participants “What are the ways in which our society does not serve the majority of its members?” and is “How can we, as individuals, spark the imagination of how to officiate social change?”.

Game development and Self-organization:

To investigate the human our potential forat efficient and peaceful self-governing we are trying to developing games in which distributed communication yields better solutions than centralized or organized communication. The intention of this project is to understand what kind of find what particular problems can be best solved by chaotic conditions and what kind require organization. This project is considering various forms of the “traveling salesman” problem puzzle problems as well as complex differential equations where each participant has access to different information.

Experimental game theory:

To better understand complex human dynamics we are experimenting with modifying standard game-theoretic activities and collecting data through observing group interactions in various conditions. Our focus is in the area of the tragedy of the commons with its many variations is it is of particular relevance to our ecological problems. We are developing different ways of playing the hawk-dove game / public goods game to study the various ways in which people relate to and attempt to solve this age-old problem.

Unlike most experimental paradigms in game theory which are solely based in quantifying behavior, our approach is much more ethnographic. We are studying emotion, cognition, and subtle behavioral elements so to create a much richer data than simply looking at final scores.

We are looking at the effects of interpersonal vs. inter-group competition, the effects of time pressure, the effects of extreme generosity or extreme selfishness has on the group, and how initial equality vs. inequality in differential advantage in the game affects willingness to cheat. we study the way people create rules and regulations to try to manage the “free rider” problem and how elements of political affiliation come into play in making rules. We are also looking at perceived fairness in various game conditions and outcomes and how it may have an effect on game tactics.

Insurrection game:

We are developing a game to evaluate mechanisms of stability and instability in oppressive governments and the efficacy of revolutionary attempts. This is done through a large group game in a field settings. The game is an elaborate tag game of tactical collective action. It demonstrates how an entire society can be in an an undesirable situation yet how it is very difficult to make that change. The game brings up questions such as, ??? is designed to help participants “What are the ways in which our society does not serve the majority of its members?” and is “How can we, as individuals, suppose to spark the imagination of how to officiate social change?”

Public goods game simulation:

risk aversion as a function of group size

Could the endowment effect be killing informal trade relations?

Coordination with differential payoff

Effects of competition in intergroup, interpersonal, and inter-cohort on performance

Slo-Go development Lab:

Plow

Well driller

Pond digger

robo-goat